Word of Mouth

We often see social media rants about products, but do they actually represent how we feel about the brands or are they really just a way to blow off steam?  Janet Morrissey for the New York Times explores this question in her article, Brands Heed Social Media. They’re Advised Not to Forget Word of Mouth and reminds companies what studies show.  Even when we put things out for the world to see, the words from our mouths the next day may be a very different story.

Tax Confusion?

What will the new tax bills mean for you?  At the moment it’s not quite clear.  Accountants and tax advisors everywhere are watching with bated breath as we approach the current tax season where these new laws will take affect.  The best advice in the article? Schedule your tax professional appointment early this year.

Confused by the Tax Bills? Be Glad You’re Not an Accountant

 

When I Grow Up…

Have you ever reached a crossroads and wondered what you should be doing with your life?  Tim Herrera for the New York Times offers these five tips to help you along the path.

–Start by looking backward
–Decide what ‘meaningful’ means to you
–Build a personal “board of directors,” a financial cushion, and take time to reflect
–Find a sponsor, not just a mentor
–Collect experience and be generous

In the article, 5 Tips to Help You Figure Out What to Do With Your Life, Tim delves deeper into each of these categories, defining the roles of a sponsor verses  mentor and gives insight into ways to construct your own group of trusted confidants.  A recommended read for anyone currently pondering their future.

More Women In Tech

Companies often say they desire a more diverse workplace without really understanding how to achieve this goal.   Katherine Zaleski, in Opinions for the New York Times highlights the fact that small changes in the interview process can make a huge difference.  From making sure the panel includes one woman, to perks that are mentioned, such as maternal leave and child care subsidy.

The Maddeningly Simple Way Tech Companies Can Employ More Women

 

Money Managers In Your Best Interest

Are you in the market for a financial planner?  Turns out that there are numerous kinds to choose from and even with current laws stating that they must do what is in your best interest, that’s not always what happens.  Before you sign on the line, read this detailed article from the New York Times.  Before You Pay for Financial Advice, Read This GuideIt offers links to further information and even a fiduciary pledge.

Instagram For The Win

As social media use continues to escalate around the world, you might be surprised to learn who is leading the pack.  Even with over two billion users, Facebook isn’t growing at the rapid rate of Instagram, who last year gained 100 million users in six-months.   Farhad Manjoo for the New York Times dives deeper into the intricacies of our love for (and frustrations with) social media in his article, Why Instagram Is Becoming Facebook’s Next Facebook. 

Last Minute Tax Prep?

Did you wait until the last minute to prepare your taxes this year?  You do have an extra three days, the deadline is April 18th.  Have questions?  Need to know about forms and deductions?  Try this article from the New York Times and if that doesn’t get you where you need to be,
give me a call!

Our Best Guidance for Filing Your Tax Return

Employee Manipulation?

After a string of issues involving both customer and driver dissatisfaction, Uber has vowed to make new investments into the driver experience.  But even as they talk about changes, the company is still engaged in a massive behavioral experiment in order to entice drivers to work more and longer hours, at times in less lucrative areas.

Noam Schreiber for the New York Times thinks that, “By mastering their workers’ mental circuitry, Uber and the like may be taking the economy back toward a pre-New Deal era when businesses had enormous power over workers and few checks on their ability to exploit it.”   Read more here: How Uber Uses Psychological Tricks to Push Its Drivers’ Buttons

Pink Collar?

wordcloud As more and more traditionally male, “blue-collar” jobs disappear, a new trend of “pink-collar” work is on the rise.  This is causing an interesting divide in the workplace where unemployed men are not willing to move into these jobs such as health aide.  One that takes soothing and calm, a “woman’s touch,” one man quipped in the article, Why Men Don’t Want the Jobs Done Mostly by Women.  Even as factories continue to close or automate, men are not seeking these types of middle-skill jobs.  Although lack of training and need for extra schooling play a part, researchers and sociologists are finding that the biggest reason is how the jobs are viewed.  At this point, many employers are turning to rebranding to encourage more men to apply.  One such ad in a hospital compared the excitement of being a surgery nurse to the rush of mountain climbing.

Hidden Monopolies?

antique-monopoly-game-hdi0aidsThe attempted merger of AT&T and Time Warner has drawn a lot of attention lately.  So much that a Senate hearing was held last week to investigate the possibility of the combined companies forming a monopoly.  During the meeting of the Senate Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee, Mark Cuban, internet entrepreneur, made the comment that people should not be concerned with the waning phone business but internet giants, Google and Facebook.  Jonathan Taplin, Op-Ed contributor for the New York Times, investigates this further in, Forget AT&T. The Real Monopolies Are Google and Facebook.